3 Comments
  1. Loved the article! Though my experience of being in an office environment working as a CFO for a company was over ten years ago (now I work from a home office, self-employed Accountant) – I do remember the constant interruptions. Getting a cup of coffee was a meeting in it’s self. I remember fantasizing about a ‘no interruption day’ and how everything would be accomplished in 1/2 the time. Now facts to support that! I knew I was right…(insert laughter here).
    The facts should be sent to every owner and business manager out there to open their eyes a little more to productivity & time management. Nice article.

  2. I look around my office and see many people who confuse being busy with being productive, and it seems to be a bit of a disease. Being a commission-only employee, it seems as though the more I work, the more I get paid, right? Not really. While not popular or comfortable at first, reducing the amount of time working has paid off. Read the negative feedback on Amazon for books like “4 Hour Work Week” and you’ll see every excuse in the world. There’s a feeling that our father’s work ethic and mentality of “working hard” and “putting in the hours” is noble and necessary for character, etc. But we don’t have to live that way anymore. There’s something just as responsible about enjoying your life right now, every day, instead of a sliver of time at the end of your life. All that on top of being more efficient in your current job.

    • You’re absolutely correct, Jon. One commenter over on Google Plus was upset because I referred to water-cooler chit-chat as wasted time because those types of chats built team morale. Well, first, in my experience, much of that chit-chat is spent complaining about work. Second, if the workday was cut in half, there’d be a lot more time for team lunches and happy hour once the workday ended at Noon or 1. If three hours of every day are wasted, anyway, and people are dissatisfied with work — why not lop those three hours off of the workday?

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